HASTAC at Fordham

The HASTAC program is a program of the Fordham Digital Humanities Working Group. Funding for two Scholars for the 2015-2016 year was provided through the generous support of the Dean of Fordham College at Rose Hill.

HASTAC (pronounced “haystack”), which stands for Humanities, Arts, Science, and Technology Advanced Collaboratory, is an interdisciplinary, international network of undergraduate and graduate students, faculty, as well as librarians, archivists, museum curators, publishers, and IT specialists. Members of the HASTAC community blog, host forums, organize events, and discuss new ideas, projects, and technologies that reconceive teaching, learning, research, writing and structuring knowledge. For more information about HASTAC Scholars and to see their discussion forums, please see the HASTAC Scholars website and also this page.


Past HASTAC Scholars

2014-2015

David Levine is an MA student in Medieval Studies at Fordham University. His primary interest is resource management and exploitation – especially pertaining to woodland – in Medieval England. His work uses multiple database programs and GIS to collect woodland locations in East Anglia and display these locations in possible configurations according to size and time period. David has attended the University of Lancaster’s Summer School program, led by Ian Gregory and titled “GIS and the Humanities,” and will be attending the DHSI in Victoria next June to work on TEI, building DH programs, and OCR. David completed my BA from SUNY-Binghamton in May of 2013 with a double major in History and Medieval Studies and currently serves as the Graduate Student Association Representative for Medieval Studies.

Louie Dean Valencia García is a senior teaching fellow and Ph.D. candidate studying Early Modern and Modern European History at Fordham University in New York City. He has been a Santander Summer Scholar, and received prestigious fellowships from Fordham’s Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, the Spanish Ministry of Education, Sports, and Culture, and the Swann Foundation at the United States Library of Congress. Louie studies cultural history, the production of space, and everyday dissent in youth and subaltern cultures in contemporary history. His research relies on GIS and Social Network Analysis.

2013-14

Alisa Beer is a Ph.D. student in the History department at Fordham University,
where she studies medieval manuscript culture and medieval pilgrimage.  She holds an M.L.S. from the School of Library and Information Science of Indiana University
Bloomington, and is particularly interested in information visualization, pedagogy, and the use of social media for scholarship.  She is also concerned about the long-term survival of DH projects and the condition of their metadata.

Will Fenton is a Ph.D. Candidate in English at Fordham University, where he specializes in nineteenth century American literature and the Digital Humanities. In addition to writing and blogging about technology, Will is the recipient of a Fordham Innovative Pedagogy Initiative Grant.

2012-2013

Patrick J. Burns is a Senior Teaching Fellow in the Department of Classics. Burns’ digital research focuses on the application of corpus-linguistics methodologies, such as tree banking, annotation, and the use of the Python Natural Language Toolkit in the study of Latin literature.  Burns participated in the NEH-sponsored Summer Institute on the Perseus Project held at Tufts University last summer that explored many of these topics. He has also been at work on a digital teaching resource, the Tin Latin Reader, which he uses in the Latin courses he teaches.

Jon Stanfill, a doctoral candidate in the Theology Department, will be investigating both the pedagogical possibilities of experiencing the world of Byzantium in the virtual realm, and the promise of cladistic analysis, which uses evolutionary biological algorithms for the editing of medieval manuscripts. Stanfill traces his interest in cladistic analysis to a seminar taught by Center for Teaching Excellence Director and medieval studies scholar Erick Keleman.

2011-2012

Elizabeth Cornell, a pre-doctoral fellow in the Department of English, was awarded the inaugural HASTAC Fellowship for her work on the Keywords Collaboratory, an interactive project directed by Fordham English professor Glenn Hendler and University of Washington professor Bruce Burgett.

One thought on “HASTAC at Fordham

  1. Pingback: Meet Fordham’s new HASTAC Scholars! | Fordham GSDH

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